10

It turned out that my initial theory was correct. By going into Central Administration -> Security -> Configure Managed Accounts and editing the SPFarm account, I could set the stored password to its correct value. Check "Change password now", "Use existing password" and enter the account password. This will update the stored password value, and the Timer ...


8

I like Arsalan's answer, however MS is pushing people to avoid server side development, which includes Timer Jobs. As timer jobs run on the SharePoint server, a poorly written timer job can have a negative impact on the farm. Also, if a customer ever moves to Office 365, any custom timer jobs will have to be re-written. An app run by the windows task ...


7

Here are few more differences between Timer Job and Windows Task schedulers: Timer Jobs Timer jobs require downtime to deploy. Control via Central Admin. Schedule of Timer Job will be backed up and restore in your normal process of SharePoint backup and restore. Can be deployed using standard WSP solution. Custom Timer Jobs provides the power to specify ...


6

Yes it is required. The Workflow Timer Service is not just responsible for your List/Documents workflows, but also for a lot of other system related tasks. It should be started on all Sharepoint Servers including Web front ends and application, search servers. There is no harm in it running as well. If it's not busy, it wont consume resources.


6

5 minutes is a good default setting. Setting it less than that as suggested can cause additional overhead. Where I've seen it be really bad, is when it's set to one minute, and yet it takes longer than a minute to finish all of the timer jobs. I've seen cases where the timer job has hung. Really depends on the environment, number of users, and if you're ...


5

Benefits of Sharepoint Timer jobs over Windows Task Scheduler are : Single point of failure : Windows Task Scheduler need to be configured on all the web servers. If you configure to run the job on 1 server only, and this server crashes, job will not work at all. Status Reporting : Windows Task Scheduler doesn't have any reporting on when was the last time ...


4

Our operations team says when you have a task that is really related to SharePoint, maybe list items iteration, logging etc etc. you should use Timer Job.. But if you have tasks not related to SharePoint at all or directly.. Than use Task Scheduler.. Example, we had an External Content Type made from SQL Server Database and the user wanted to iterate ...


4

It really depends on your environment and how much workflow activity you have, but I would probably not be comfortable setting it to 1 minute in any of the environments I have worked. Setting it to 1 minute could mean a lot of increased activity and additional resources needed to support these checks. If you have heavy activity and limited resources you ...


4

Not that I am aware of. I think it’s hard if not impossible for someone to come up with a product which can (efficiently) address enormous amount of possibilities with SharePoint without custom code. There is a “SharePoint Timer job Item” VS.NET extension which can download and get started with a template for your custom timer job.


4

If the above solution doesn't work, check your Group Policy. To get the service to start I had to retype the password in the Log On tab in the Service Properties. When I'd done this I was given a message saying that the account had been granted Log On Locally rights. I could then start the service, but the problem would recur some hours later. So I got onto ...


4

As this is your Development machine, i would try to re run the Config wizard, we had the same issue in past and re run fixed it. You can run via gui or command line: PSConfig.exe -cmd upgrade -inplace b2b -force


3

Once you have changed the credentials, just restart the timer service. This will reset the credentials and apply the new ones. Restating the service will not create any problems.


3

You can go through the Url : https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee704549.aspx or you can apply this: $farm = Get-SPFarm $farm.TimerService.Instances | foreach { $_.Stop(); $_.Start(); }


3

It's unsupported because that isn't the only place the connection string resides. There are a few SharePoint Objects that would also have to be updated (including making direct changes to the Configuration database). This is unsupported in and of itself. You'll need to use cliconfg to create a SQL Alias or rebuild the farm.


2

What activity would you expect to execute with a custom timer job without coding? This would mean you would not have access to the server object model or be able to interact with SharePoint internally. You probably should create a windows scheduled task to do what you need to do if you don't need to interact with SharePoint internally - for example kicking ...


2

Ensure that the account: has the dbcreator role on the db server securityadmin role on the db server db_owner role for all databases in the farm http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee924649.aspx


2

The solution in this situation: Check the custom timer jobs.


2

This isn't my forte but I ran across the note below on this MSDN posting; perhaps that will help. If you wanted a job to run on all servers, including application servers, your class should derive from SPServiceJobDefinition. Pass the timer service (SPFarm.Local.TimerService) as the SPService parameter of the SPServiceJobDefinition(String, SPService)...


2

It would be easiest to just let the workflow itself do the work. Just let the workflow start when a new item is created. Then depending on whether it should run initially the do the following: If it should run initially: Do the real work of the workflow Check frequency and delay for that period Loop back to beginning If it shouldn't run initially: ...


2

I finally figured out what was wrong. It was our old web application, maybe it somehow got damaged during the server crash. So I created a new web application and tested the timer there. It worked fine. Hope this can help somebody out there.


2

You might want to try clearing the configuration cache. The steps for doing this are posted on a few places on the web, here's a link to one: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/jamesway/archive/2011/05/23/sharepoint-2010-clearing-the-configuration-cache.aspx The steps are formatted and it'll take too long to copy and paste and reformat here, but essentially - Stop ...


2

Here you find something about SP2010 which I think is also the right approach for SP2013: https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/office/en-US/47954854-254f-4c72-8434-18a4072c952d/sharepoint-2010-health-analyzer-alerts-to-sptimerservice-sptimerv4?forum=sharepointadminprevious Farm account need not be in local administrators group on any servers in ...


2

Rule for SharePoint Workflow Timer service is: Start the Web Application Service on all servers that have the Workflow Timer Service running. Or Disable the Workflow Timer Service on servers that are not running the Web Application service. Read more here If you stop the Workflow timer but Web applcation service is running then you will not run properly....


2

The SharePoint Timer Service is a crucial component for each server in the farm and should be running on every server. Excerpt from a related and very informative MSDN blog post: If the Timer Service or any of its instances on servers begins to malfunction, it won't take long for problems to begin appearing across the farm.


1

Saw this didn't have an answer marked and wanted to share what worked for me step by step to see if it will help others using SharePoint 2013. On my database server opened up SMSS, then for each SharePoint database, made my service and web account db_datareader, db_datawriter, db_owner, SPDataAccess. Ensured both service and web account had the ...


1

This is a very silly alternative but it has worked for me many times when I have faced a similar situation. Create a new timer job with a new name copying all the logic from this timer job and deploy it. Most probably it will work.


1

In addition to the above, timer jobs are much easier to test, as you can just run them in visual studio. Another advantage is that if the timerjob has any configuration data it can be installed in a simple app,config


1

Since all SharePoint timer jobs are inheriting Microsoft.SharePoint.Administration.SPJobDefinition which inherits SPPersistedObject, these timer jobs are written in the Hierarchical Object Store which is directly in the SPFarm database. Here is some more information about the previous sentence. Anyway, the point is that your context is important when ...


1

Try running the SharePoint Configuration Wizard on your farm from one of the servers, it should apply any pending upgrades that are needed to the databases used by the environment.


1

If you recently applied the CU updatd to Sharepoint it may be your problem. See http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/da-DK/sharepointadminprevious/thread/5a6e6e83-b59f-4099-a86f-a07723ff2b98


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