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23

My observations (answers at bottom): If this is too long then just read the headings Developer => Accept change If you want to stay calm and not have your world changed all the time, then maybe a job as a Software Developer isn't the right for you unless you want to maintain old legacy applications. Cobol hasn't changed much lately. Companies/Application ...


12

So, I'll wade into this discussion. Apologies for the wall of text. Some background - I was a developer in CMS 2001/2002 before we joined the SharePoint group in 2003. I've build on top of the core SharePoint codebase as part of the publishing features, taxonomy, etc. I'm super familiar and comfortable with server solutions and how to extend SP on the ...


8

Install-SPSolution -Identity <solution.wsp> -WebApplication <name or guid of web app> -GacDeployment the above should work! what is your solution scoped to? farm webapp site web? It should be scoped to site to be deployed to a specific webapp! under central admin look at the wsp list and see where its currently deployed to, is it global or to ...


8

CSOM is the best thing to happen to the platform. It lets us run code where ever the hell we want, how we want. The REST API (not ListData.svc, that should never have made it into the release) took it a step further and allowed client side code to be easily written in JavaScript too. The problem with SharePoint solutions was the upgradability of the ...


8

At the end of 2013, I decided to dive into the SharePoint app world (Oh, they are now called add-ins) and did few samples and shared my learnings. I had added a disclaimer to the blog: I did not make any production apps as I am yet to get allocated on a project which uses SP 2013 apps More than 3 years down the line, the disclaimer is still true in my ...


8

The amount of change we've had to deal with in the SharePoint Development space in the last 12 years has been exhausting. I've lived through it and will tell you it's just hard for management and users to accept we need to keep learning completely new frameworks, changing approaches and migrating solutions. I've had solutions that have been on every single ...


6

Following are the powershell commands to deploy a wsp to single web application: Add-SPSolution <wsp file name>.wsp Install-SPSolution –Identity <wsp file name>.wsp –WebApplication <Site URL> –GACDeployment


6

That's a great discussion out here! Let me put my 50cents. A lot of different topics are discussed, I have a lot of different thoughts and don't even know how to structure them. I'll try. I think there are few reasons why Microsoft invent new approaches. And the main reason is moving to cloud. Consider image from here - SharePoint converged code base. ...


5

You can use below code to find deployment status $Name = "MySharePoint.wsp" Write-Host -NoNewline "Waiting..." $Solution = get-SpSolution $Name while($Solution.JobExists) { sleep 5 Write-Host -NoNewline "." $Solution = get-SpSolution $Name } Write-Host "Deployment Completed"


4

Retract Solution fires off the Uninstall process of the WSP package from the farm. It's equivalent to the Uninstall-SPSolution PowerShell command and the opposite of the Install-SPSolution command. Remove Solution is the equivalent of the Remove-SPSolution PowerShell command and is the opposite of the Add-SPSolution command. It can be seen as deleting the ...


3

you can use the following powershell $farm = Get-SPFarm $wsp = $farm.Solutions.Item("customsolution.wsp").SolutionFile $wsp.SaveAs("c:\temp\customsolution.wsp")


3

I end up getting this issue resolved. I had to enabled scripting capabilities. I followed this guide Sign in to Office 365 Go to the SharePoint admin center select settings Under Custom Script: Change both options to "Allow users to run custom subscription on..." It takes roughly 24 hours for the change to take effect on O365 I have found additional ...


3

1) Open your manifest file of Package 2) (+ Edit Options) Expand it. Click on Overwrite generated XML and edit manifest in the XML editor link. > Edit manifest in the XML editor. 3) In Edit mode node look like. <Assemblies> <Assembly Location="SharePointProject1.dll" DeploymentTarget="GlobalAssemblyCache" /> </Assemblies> 4) Just ...


3

SP.Update() should work after you add the solution to the farm. var complete = false; while (!complete) { complete = SPFarm.Local.Solutions[“solutionName.wsp”] != null; if (!complete){ SPFarm.Local.Update(); Thread.Sleep(10000); } }


2

I recently have a similar requirement. I needed to rebrand a proof of concept into a well named product. I wrote this script to handle most of the job: $root = Get-Item C:\Projects\ $allFolders = Get-ChildItem $root -Recurse -Directory | Sort-Object FullName -Descending $allFiles = Get-ChildItem $root -Recurse | ? { -Not $_.PSIsContainer} | Sort-Object ...


2

Basically handle it how you would when presented this in other languages, pass an array for the site parameter. For format in powershell for this is: [string[]]$stringArray $stringArray = @("site1","site2") That way you can handle how many you send and/or do another method depending what you pass. [update] There isn't a type you can pass in to handle ...


2

You can create all of the mentioned artifacts content type, lists, workflow and GUI in SharePoint Hosted apps. But remember that you have to perform all your coding using REST and/or javascript client object model.


2

I'm also relatively new to SharePoint development, but will try share some of my experience. :) When I created new code/functionality to a site, I make sure that I 'deactivate' the webpart/feature, then under your Admin Settings I retract the solution from the farm. Before I package the solution in Visual Studio, I update both the .feature title and ...


2

You need something like the following: $solution = "example.wsp" Install-SPSolution -Identity $solution $deployed = $False while ($deployed -eq $False) { sleep -s 5 $s = Get-SPSolution -Identity $solution if ($s.Deployed -eq $True -And $s.JobExists -eq $False) { $deployed = $True } }


2

The function “GetSPSolutionLastDeploymentSucceeded” is useful to find out whether the last solution deployment succeeded and to output the last operation details which includes error information if there was a failure. function GetSPSolutionLastDeploymentSucceeded([string]$solutionName) { # Get the solution again to make sure all deployment info is up-...


2

The key file only determines the PublicKeyToken part of the full assembly name. The version name remains specific to each project and can be set independently.


2

Look the "Module" element of feature elements.xml. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee231567.aspx Here is an example of the Elements.xml file for a module: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <Elements xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/sharepoint/"> <Module Name="Module1"> <File Path="Module1\Sample.txt" Url="Module1/...


2

We have an entire e-Project Management Office set up this way. It's a site collection with subsites by division, then we use a custom site template to create a subsite for each project, then roll up an overview of each project to the home page. In each project, we use tasks, milestone, project document library for project charter, requirements documents, etc....


2

This you can achieve through by creating a Remote Event Receiver instead of a farm solution in SharePoint 2013 , to create a Remote Event Receiver you should develop a Provider Hosted App. In Remote Event Reciever you can handle all list item events like normal event recievers and you can write the logic over there as per your requirements. Please refer ...


2

Run this below scripts from SharePoint Management Shell: For Farm solution Add-SPSolution “Your WSP Location”\”Your WSP Name”.wsp Install-SPSolution –Identity "WSP Name".wsp –WebApplication "Site Url" –GACDeployment For Sandbox solution Add-SPUserSolution -LiteralPath c:\CandidateSandboxedSolutions\MySandboxedSolution.wsp -Site http://MyServer/sites/...


1

Open the project folder You will find the "Feature" folder inside that. If you have any other .cs or .aspx files outside the folder, then it might be solution. If you don't have any thing outside of the "Feature" folder and you have files inside the "Feature" folder, then it is a FEATURE. Project can also contain the solution as well as the feature. Hope ...


1

By looking at the Visual Studio solution (not to be confused with a SharePoint solution WSP), you can easily tell what you have: In the Visual Studio project (from the Solution Explorer of VS), if you see a "Features" folder with one or more sub-folders in it: you have a SharePoint project that builds into a SharePoint WSP package. That package contains ...


1

Based on the comment, Exception arises when folder does not exit. So solution is following if (!System.IO.Directory.Exists(folderpath)) { SPSecurity.RunWithElevatedPrivileges(delegate() { System.IO.Directory.CreateDirectory(folderpath); } Needs to check the folder if it exists before writing file.


1

In case this works on your DEV machine, but not in other environments, ensure the folder exists on all WFE servers of the farm (if there are many), as the code may be executed on any of them.


1

You can extract them from the site collection level, not a subsite. They'd be located at ../sites/sitecollection/_catalogs/solutions/


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