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Uses of client secret in production environment is not advisable. Microsoft recommend to use SSL Certificate in production environment. Here are the steps to use it. Register the app in azure ad. give the app permission as per your need. Get SSL certificate or Self Signed Certificate with key protected. Go to certificates & secrets section and upload it ...


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The usual way for any .NET application is to use <appSettings file="Secrets.config" >[...]</appSettings>, and then exclude Secrets.config from source control using .gitignore. I tend to also provide a Secrets.Example.config file in source control, so future developers know what they need to collect. Please be aware that the keys will ...


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Overall, I don't recommend going this route because there are no easy ways of implementing it. And whatever option you choose - it will be extra maintenance work that could be spent doing something more useful. But you can research the following options: Create a separate web application and setup daily syncrhonization process using Sharegate. Just make ...


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Actually, Drop Off Libraries can help you a lot. Seperate your HR Folders with required permissions and redirect your files into these folders with rules. Take a look at here - Create Content Organizer rules to route documents


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SharePoint does not support permissions management based on metadata. The best practice it to store sensitive documents separately, in a different SharePoint library or at least a folder.


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I would recommend that you use an Azure Key Vault to store these credentials. You can then either access the credentials directly via your code or by having a "dummy value" in your web.config that is replaced at runtime by your application. More information can be found here: About Azure Key Vault Tutorial: Use a managed identity to connect Key ...


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