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Does anyone know of any tools that will properly validate with SharePoint Online and scan for ADA violations?

I used to have tools that worked with "on-prem" but the cloud thing doesn't work so well with these tools. Most tools I have found in my searching do not address the cloud aspect of validating to "SharePoint Online.

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  • Have you looked at support.office.com/en-us/article/…? There are also links to the bottom of the page to contact MSFT regarding disability and SPO.
    – user6024
    May 8, 2019 at 17:50
  • Thanks for pointing that information out, good information, but not quite what I was looking for. I want a scanning tool to crawl my site and look for violations from all of the users that are able to update content and add documents. The SharePoint Online Framework is solid with ADA, it's the content that we add to it that worries. me. May 8, 2019 at 22:21

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There are a couple of really good online resources that I would recommend:

Although there some basic steps that you need to cover

1: Choose the Right Graphics

Carefully chosen graphics are an enormous part of accessible websites. after you include graphics, they ought to not flash quite thrice per second. Graphics should even have a description/caption that may be read aloud to the visually impaired. If you've got informative or fun visual content, you would like everyone to be ready to enjoy and learn from it!

2: Add Alt-Text and Readable Fonts

Provide alt-text for all images in your code. Alt-text captions allow site readers to explain your images audibly. Fonts are another crucial component of accessibility. Use fonts that are easy to read, like Georgia, Open Sans, and Quicksand. Avoid putting a lightweight font color on a light-weight background; a mixture like yellow text on a pale background causes people to strain to read it. Equally problematic could be a pale font on a stark black background. follow light backgrounds with dark for many of your content.

3: Make Website Features Logical

An ADA-compliant website must even be understandable to a large audience. the location should operate predictably and have helpful labels over blocks of content and media. for instance, put a transparent “x” within the upper corner of a pop-up to indicate users the way to close the window. the location should be inbuilt the way that avoids user error and has readable instructions on all forms where users are expected to enter information.

4: Code Your Site with Standard HTML Tags

The robust requirement of ADA recommendations is the most technical one. It means the code should be readable by an assistive reader. The code on your site must use standard HTML tags. Complex image documents can’t be understood by software that reads text aloud for visually impaired website users. The good news is that most website platforms, including WordPress, are designed to operate using modern code format.

5: Make the Site Keyboard- and Pause-Friendly

The robust requirement of ADA recommendations is that the most technical one. It means the code should be readable by an assistive reader. The code on your site must use standard HTML tags. Complex image documents can’t be understood by software that reads text aloud for visually impaired website users. the nice news is that almost all website platforms, including WordPress, are designed to control using modern code format.

For your cloud platform requirement, you may look into this article I wrote about AI-driven accessibility testing done by some companies. They scan and test your websites

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