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Is it possible to create a list where you can add items to a list but not view items in a list?

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you can allow to view only items that were created by the user. To set up this settings go to the List Settings -> Advanced Settings, set Read items that were created by the user in the Item-level Permissions section.

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No, giving users Add item access automatically gives them read access to the list. Even creating a custom permission with Add items automatically enables Read. You'll have to use item level permissions like Alexander states.

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  • True, but only for UI. You can do it via API. – Alex Burdin Mar 23 '17 at 8:18
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You can do this with inbound e-mail, by allowing the list to receive e-mails from any sender. In this case anybody can post to the list, but only people with SharePoint permissions can read the list.

Be careful when using this feature, as you open your list to spam.

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You can define a workflow that resets permissions on items added to the list, such that only a specific user or groups has rights to it immediately after it's added.

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It's possible to create RoleDefinition with "Add Items" base permission only like this (CSOM):

var context = new ClientContext(siteURL);
var permissions = new BasePermissions();
permissions.Set(PermissionKind.AddListItems);
var roleDefCI = new RoleDefinitionCreationInformation();
roleDefCI.BasePermissions = permissions;
roleDefCI.Name = "Add Only";
roleDefCI.Description = "Allow only Add Items";
var roleDef = context.Web.RoleDefinitions.Add(roleDefCI);
context.ExecuteQuery();

Assign only this permission level to user on list (user still should have Read access on Web/Parent).

You have to set all needed field values prior to update call, because after item created you wouldn't be able even to get the ID of created item. ExecuteQuery will throw an error that item was deleted, but item will be created.

A bit of a hack, but might be useful in some situations. Use with caution.

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