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In our test installation of SP 2013, the search service account was given read-only rights to the file share locations. USER-A has access to the same content as SEARCH-SERVICE. USER-B does not have permission to the directories within the file share.

When USER-B executes a search results are returned that normally are not accessible in the file share navigation.

Of course, when USER-B clicks on the link to the file it does not work.

What would be a reason that USER-B is seeing the increased results?

I have two theories.

  1. The file share rights are merely blocking the directory at the root and USER-B would be able to list the files in that directory, but not access
  2. NTLM is being used at the moment and this is causing something.

Any ideas would be appreciated - before I return with questions to the IT department, I would like to eliminate a few possibilities.

Thanks..

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The crawler just enumerates the directories and returns the folders and files found to the Content Processor. It also returns the Access Control Lists. I have seen this when the permissions on the file shares are not correctly set.

I would reevaluate the permissions on the file share. Alternatively, create a new share and fix the permissions there, then transfer the content.

I don't know what you mean by

NTLM is being used at the moment and this is causing something.

  • I was wondering if the NTLM v Kerebos was selected for authentication and that impeeded some passing of credentials. If the ACL is taken as well then I thing its a situation with the permisssions on the file share. – Jason Dawe JD Mar 20 '17 at 12:02
  • I will probably stant up a Test file share on a VM and compare the results before I submit a request to IT to visit the permissions on such a large legacy file share... Thanks – Jason Dawe JD Mar 20 '17 at 12:08

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