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I am new to workflows and am not a developer, BTW. I have a custom list with several workflows attached which is designed to send email notifications to many at various time intervals based on a date in a CALCULATED COLUMN During testing, the workflows worked because they are currently set to initiate on item creation, change, or manually.

Now at pilot stage, folks are entering data with license expiring in the future, and of course, the workflows are not working because they are deployed at the time of creation of the data file.

DOES ANYONE KNOW HOW I CAN SET THE WORKFLOWS TO INITIATE BASED ON THE DATE IN THE CALCULATED COLUMN AND NOT ON ITEM CREATION, CHANGE OR MANUALLY?

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There are a few approaches, all with varying degrees of feasibility.

Option 1
Continue to use an on creation workflow, but alter the logic a little to check if the calculated date is greater than today, if so, pause until that date and then continue on. This can work, but if the date changes while the workflow is paused, it can lead to unexpected or mistimed emails going out.

Option 2
Make the workflow manually initiated. Use the information management policy settings link in the library settings to kick off a workflow when this date is met. This sort of falls down if it is going to be a recurring thing, like yearly renewals.

Option 3
This is the "better" option as it really is more of what you are looking for. Create a timer job or a console application that runs daily looking at the list/library checking for items where the calculated date is today. Then handle whatever you need to do for items that meet the criteria. This is really what you would want to do, but requires you to start from scratch.

  • Thank you SO much for your time. Would creating a timer job or a console application be something that a server admin would do? As a SharePoint Coordinator, I do not touch the SharePoint server, but I know some guys who do. :) – RSpain May 19 '16 at 18:40
  • It would have to be created by a developer and deployed, in the case of a timer job, or configured as a scheduled task, in the case of a console application, by a server admin. – Eric Alexander May 19 '16 at 18:53
  • My theory is confirmed. Thank you, honestly, thank you, from Oklahoma to Ohio!!!!! – RSpain May 19 '16 at 19:13

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