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Our org currently uses SharePoint 2010 to manage an Image library. This library currently contains about 12k+ images of about 4-8mb (considered to be low resolution images) each.

The motive behind storing these low resolution images in SharePoint (The high resolution ones are stored in a file server) is to be able to provide clickable image URLs within the corporate intranet and also be able to provide a thumb nail generating solution.

All these 12k+ images live on the same library (Threshold is set to 13000) and that is causing performance issues. The images are being added through web services (Imaging service to upload and list service to upload metadata using a Java client.. COPY service doesn't seem to work for a Image library). These web services don't seem to work if the threshold is brought down to 5000.

Every day 5-10 new images are being added to this library and the SharePoint solution doesn't seem to scale.

The users are looking for a flat storage (No folders - all files in the same folder). In this given scenario is SharePoint the way to go?

Your thoughts on this please.

Thanks!

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Personally I say no, unless you configure BLOB storage. These types of files are terrible for SharePoint as they get stored in the SQL server database unless RBS is enabled. The next steps is then people will want to version these images as well which creates a copy of the existing item. This can quickly bloat storage.

If this is the only reason you are considering SharePoint, don't use it in this manner. Get a legit digital asset management solution, http://www.capterra.com/digital-asset-management-software/.

  • Thank you for the suggestion! Completely agree with you.. Are you aware of any concrete presentations with statistics that could convince management? – rakpan Jul 1 '14 at 0:23
  • Just anecdotal evidence from people using the system for this very thing in current and past employment. Just because it can, doesn't mean it should. – Eric Alexander Jul 1 '14 at 0:32
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I would say No. Mainly due to size issue and it's going to be hard to retrieve the files if something goes wrong with SharePoint.

If you are using the Blob cache, also using the Managed Metadata column, then you can over come this. Also Plan your list according to tackle the performance issue.

To BLOB or Not To BLOB: Large Object Storage in a Database or a Filesystem

objects smaller than 256K are best stored in a database while objects larger than 1M are best stored in the filesystem. Between 256K and 1M, the read:write ratio and rate of object overwrite or replacement are important factors

  • Thank you for the suggestion! Completely agree with you.. Are you aware of any concrete presentations with statistics that could convince management? – rakpan Jul 1 '14 at 0:25
  • their is no such blog/presentation, but you can create your own i.e using the performance issue, get the stuff from Blob, expense on blog storage, large list handling etc – Waqas Sarwar MVP Jul 1 '14 at 5:39

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