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It seems you have to re-create SharePoint Lists Web Service proxy and re-build solution in VS. References How to: Add a Reference to a Web Service


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We ended up using the client object model. where ManagedMetaDataField is a simple domain object. The following worked. Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.Web web = clientContext.Web; Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.List documentLibrary = clientContext.Web.Lists.GetByTitle(documentLibraryName); ListItem item = documentLibrary.GetItemById(itemID); ...


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This is for a SOAP based service: http://wmostafaw.wordpress.com/2012/08/07/calling-web-service-from-infopath-2010-with-parameters/ It demonstrates how to pass parameters to a service. The same should apply for WCF.


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The web.config for application pages is located in the {SharePointRoot} folder. However, I recommended that you move your service to the ISAPI folder (mapped to _vti_bin) or to a separate IIS website.


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Use AppCatalog class for this. Proof of concept below: class StackExchangeProof { static void Main(string[] args) { var login = "admin@yourdomain.onmicrosoft.com"; var password = "YourHardP@ssw0rd"; var url = "https://yourdomain.sharepoint.com"; var creds = new SharePointOnlineCredentials(login, ...


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One method I have used for SOAP Web Services was to take the asmx file and deploy it to the file system in SharePoint _layouts/TimeZoneWS/TimeZoneWS.asmx. I deploy it to the farm as a GAC to register it with my SharePoint 14 hive. Then, I am able to call to it by opening a ServiceProxy in JQuery. var serviceUrl = ...


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I imagine the WSDL file is for the external service you want to query, so you don't need to mess around with _vti_bin or similar. Try calling the service from a Console application (without thinking about SharePoint) by adding a Service Reference. Then when you have that working you could use the same approach to reference the service, just inside a Web ...


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I have a detailed walkthrough that shows how to do this. The post was written for SharePoint 2010 but it will work for SharePoint 2013. Walkthrough: Creating a Custom ASP.NET (ASMX) Web Service in SharePoint 2010


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The simplest way is to write your web service code directly in asmx file and save it in: C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\15\TEMPLATE\LAYOUTS\SomeFolder\MyWebService.asmx Then you can call it like this: http://mysiteurl/_layouts/15/SomeFolder/MyWebService.asmx It would be better, of course, to compile your web ...


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Copy does just that, does a one for one copy from the source to the destination. After the copy succeeds, I'd make another SPServices call using UpdateListItems to blank out the fields you don't need populated.


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You can use a deferred with a resolve for your return value that is populated during async execution. After that you return a promise that you catch in a done method on function calling (check jQuery documentation: http://api.jquery.com/deferred.promise/): functionToCall().done(function (returnedValue) { // do something with the returned value }); ...


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Provided that BCS is connected to the web service and not to the DB directly, you should not need to worry about any changes at all.


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For SharePoint 2010 there won't be an issue in rendering regular pages in an iFrame, but for SharePoint 2013 (and also Excel Services pages) you'll probably run into X-FRAME-OPTIONS: SAMEORIGIN issues. For SharePoint 2013 it is the preferred way to add <WebPartPages:AllowFraming runat="server" /> to the page you're framing. ...


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From the CRM perspective, no idea! But I guess, basically, you can create a page in SharePoint where you provision your webpart. Then you can create an iframe in CRM with the url to the pageUrl + "isDlg=1" which will hide the header and left nav etc. You must, though, make sure that all users that will be able to see this in CRM also has access to the ...



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