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9

CAML queries are NOT vulnerable to SQL injection. I don't think you'll find any direct reference or proof. Consider that the conversion from CAML to SQL all happens between the data layer and the SharePoint API. You can't control how SharePoint generates the SQL for a given CAML statement and therefore you don't have to worry about SQL injection. That's ...


8

Definitely don't want to go the SQL query route because you can easily create an ineffecient query if you don't understand the underlying data model...also possible that you'll develop a query that breaks or becomes inefficient after a CU or SP is applied. CAML queries are very efficient and depending on the scope of your query you have a lot of options. ...


8

I'd go for the SQL database. For several reasons: Storing into SharePoint list adds a lot of overhead that you don't need. With 20K items per day you'll reach the supported max in 15000 days and list throtling limit in 6 hours But most important with that amount of data what you want to get out is aggregate to make sense of the data. And this is the area ...


7

First of all you should just rule out the use of SQL. You should not use SQL directly against SharePoint content databases. If you ever do modifications directly using SQL that SharePoint Farm becomes unsupported for ever. Even just doing reads makes your SharePoint Farm unsupported as long as they are occuring and may cause any kind of problems as ...


5

I would, and have in the past, use a separate SQL database to store all of that data. This will require additional work for the presentation of the data, but using BCS, SSRS and/or PowerPivot, you can pretty easily pull that into SharePoint. I wouldn't put that much into a SP content database and expect good things ;)


4

All queries against SharePoint data should be done through the SharePoint Object Model or Web Services. Creating solutions that access the database directly will result in an unsupported installation of SharePoint. Though you have nothing preventing you from doing direct SQL queries, you will not get any support on this site for doing anything that will ...


4

I'd highly discourage doing this kind of operation. Even though reads from the content database only makes your installation unsupported as long as they are occuring, you shouldn't do them. The problems you'll run into are: You are very likely to affect SharePoints operations in unsupported ways remember you can't even read without introducing locks You ...


4

SharePoint Search will return the url to the document in Path when it thinks a file is a document (isDocument == 1), but if the file isn't a recognized file type SharePoint will treat it as a list item and return the url of the display form in Path. You can add support for more file types by adding IFilters (see here for PDF: How to configure PDF iFilter ...


3

Updates or other operations that directly target the database are a taboo in SharePoint, so you need to search for another alternative. The batch update infrastructure comes to mind. Using batch update you can define a set of update commands that will be executed as a batch by the server. That way you will be able to process all your update as a block ...


3

The purpose of the Full recovery model is to enable you to recover your database after a failure. Full recovery retains every database transaction in the transaction log file (usually the .ldf file), meaning that you can usually use the "tail of the log", in addition to your database backups, to recover your data up to the point of failure, or to a specific ...


3

Enable SessionStateService... http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff607989.aspx


3

You'll likely want the SharePoint Products and Technologies Protocol Documentation. These contain descriptions about the database structure, including table schema, sprocs, and so forth... Along with a lot of other information. And as everyone else has noted, making changes is, for the most part, unsupported. Check out KB841057 for more information on ...


3

The following whitepaper details all enterprise-only features and how they are used with SharePoint: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc990273.aspx It also includes a table that relates SQL Server editions with SharePoint functions. The most complete overview of SQL Server features can be found at ...


3

A few things come to mind, using BCS and external lists to bring the content in, creating a DVWP with the database as a data source, using SSRS to bring the data into SharePoint. Some references on the BCS, Link 1, Link 2, Link 3


3

You can write your own authentification provaider. I think this articles will helpful: Forms Authentication in SharePoint Products and Technologies (Part 1): Introduction Forms Authentication in SharePoint Products and Technologies (Part 2): Membership and Role Provider Samples


3

A simple way would be to make either a SharePoint list that contains all of the fields you need or an external sql table then have a timer job cache the results daily (or more?). You could also (either in additional, or only) have the call on the page write the results to a table/list and query that table/list before making the expensive call. The second ...


3

The right way to grant access is to use the SPWebApplication.GrantAccessToProcessIdentity method. It sets up the database permissions for you, but remember to run it again if you add content databases. You can do this with the following PowerShell: $webApp = Get-SPWebApplication TEAM_SITE_URL $webApp.GrantAccessToProcessIdentity("domain\username of MY SITE ...


3

If you have the old db-server up and running, use the following command in PowerShell: Get-SPSite -ContentDatabase <SourceContentDb> | Move-SPSite -DestinationDatabase <DestinationContentDb> This command moves all site collections from the source content database to the destination content database. Reference: Move site collections ...


3

Strategies for accomplishing this query while working around the constraints: Shorten your query: Do you really need to update 5k records at the same time? Prefer to reduce updates to those actually being changed. If still too big for a successful update then you can break up the records and only update 1k at a time. Change your connection method from ...


3

For SP 2010, you can use Web Analytics feature built in SharePoint: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ecm/archive/2010/03/21/introducing-web-analytics-in-sharepoint-2010.aspx For SP 2013 things have changed a bit, so you have to use Usage reports: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj715890.aspx


2

there are commercial vendors (Avepoint, Idera, Quest, et al) that offer reporting utilities that read the SP databases.. you may want to consider using the Usage & Health Data services to obtain similar information (see - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee663480.aspx ).


2

PowerShell is going to be your best bet. Interacting directly with the database is not encouraged.


2

well, state service just use SQL DB to store user session data so Guids are most probably refers to current User session. Lock on a SQL table can appeared after too many requests at the same time. Probably your State Service is a performance bottleneck for a bigger farm? Could you please enable SQL profiling on State DB and check its performance and locks? ...


2

I suggest you writing your code in C# or VB.NET, There's no support for direct DB operations. You can use the OOTB Lists web service to update the list: Lists.UpdateListItems Method (Lists)(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/lists.lists.updatelistitems.aspx) Or use the SharePoint object model like this: SPList list = web.Lists["ListName"]; ...


2

You just need the Database Engine Services (not even its children features). The management tools (basics) are recommended to quickly & visually manage your instance but they can be installed on a separate machine. Anything else is optional and not required / used by SharePoint Foundation 2010 and it's always a good practice to limit your installation ...


2

What are you attempting to accomplish? Reading SharePoint databases can cause locking problems. Writing to SharePoint databases will put you in an unsupported state. See KB841057


2

FileRef will give you the URL of file FileDirRef will give you path of folder the file exists in and FileLeafRef is the name of the file! Hope this helps!


2

What you are looking at IS the URL needed. Forms/DispForm.aspx?ID=45 Let's break that URL down. "Forms/" It's a form. "DispForm.aspx" That's the form used to display results; which is what the search spider used. But with out an ID entry, you won't get any form results, just the form. "?ID=45" that's the particular form results to pull up and display. So ...


2

Try with FileName field as follow: select Title, Path, Filename from scope() Hope it helps!! :) It it's not then I believe, u have to go through the steps Per Jakobsen has mentioned above.


2

There is another way to use an Alias for the server Instance. so in the new server use alias which will reflect with old server instance.



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