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9

There are lots of point to discuss before coming to a conclusion here. But I will just explain the different possible ways you could do backup in SharePoint in an order of good to best. Central Admin Backup - This is a default UI option that comes within Central Administration. It allows to take full and differential backups. You have the additional ...


8

Definitely don't want to go the SQL query route because you can easily create an ineffecient query if you don't understand the underlying data model...also possible that you'll develop a query that breaks or becomes inefficient after a CU or SP is applied. CAML queries are very efficient and depending on the scope of your query you have a lot of options. ...


6

The SharePoint_Shell_Access role gives you access to the content databases and the configuration database, and permission to execute the stored procedures. The farm administrator (not to be confused with the farm account) does not automatically have access to the content dbs. It can also grant you the role of "difficult SharePoint person" from the ...


5

Microsoft licensing can seem complicated if you are doing that for the first time and I would advise you to contact a licensing specialist in your country/region that can help you optimize for best price and licensing deals. For a company of 10000 people you should not be checking these prices online, you need to talk to licensing specialist! Chances are you ...


5

First thing you should do is choose the appropriate recovery model for your databases. If you need point in time restore, go for the FULL recovery model. The price you have to pay is to make regular log backups or your logfile will grow indefinitely. Taking a full backup does not stop them from growing. If you use mirroring or log shipping, you also need to ...


4

Which version of SharePoint. If you're using SharePoint 2010, the easiest way is an external list with BCS through SharePoint Designer. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee557243.aspx Paul.


4

I believe it's permission related, we didn't have as much resistance in doing that here, but I think the reason is this: In order to use PowerShell, an administrator must be assigned the SharePoint_Shell_Access role on any databases against which PowerShell will be used. For example, to perform tasks that read or manipulate data in the ...


4

Here are some details about support for large databases with SP1. http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/blog/Pages/BlogPost.aspx?pID=988 Officially there is support up to 4TBs with optimization, but realistically that is difficult to support and should only be used in extreme exceptions. Technically there were no real changes made to support the additional ...


4

Simplest answer is: No. Similar issue (follow first link provided in answer): SharePoint License for Database Server Look also at comment by Jesus Shelby The only exception would be if you are running Reporting Service in integration mode, then you would have SharePoint installed alongside the SQL instance hosting the report server.


4

Doing the SQL Server backup of the content databases is almost identical to what you are doing with the PowerShell script: protecting your content. This is of course the most important thing that you will want to protect. The advantage that doing these backups through a maintenance plan on SQL gives you is that you can perform both full and differential ...


4

It's not the prerequisites installation which selects sql, but the SharePoint installation. To run on a real Sql Server select Server Farm and then Complete, NOT Standalone or Stand-alone: When you then run the Configuration Wizard you are prompted to select the SQL server: Images taken from How to Install SharePoint 2010 on Small Farm – Part 1: Full ...


4

You should be backing up and truncating your TLOGS. If you have not been doing that, than yes, do a backup, truncate, and shrink will restore space. To keep that space however, you will need to set growth limits on your database and log files. Microsoft has a paper on "best practices" with SQL maintenance: ...


3

The server collation must be configured for case-insensitive, which is ok in your case. If you use SharePoint itself to create its different databases, it will set the required collation automatically. However, if you use precreated databases - make sure you to change the collation manually. Otherwise, SharePoint won't even let you use those databases.


3

I just installed SSE 2010 and it is SQL Sever Express 2008 SP1. (Build 10.0.2531.0) So to avoid the 4 GB limit for content DBs I'd recommend to download and install SQL Server Express 2008 R2 and do a farm install instead of a single server install. This moves the limit to 10 GB. If you can afford the license cost, it is also possible to use a full version ...


3

Here are a few resons on why to upgrade Upgrade to SQL Server 2008 R2 - performance and availability SQL Server 2005 mainstream support will end fairly soon (read more at http://support.microsoft.com/gp/lifesupsps) Security Better Reporting Services


3

You can use the SQL alias tool (cliconfg.exe) on your server to just create an alias with the original servername, and then point it to the new one. This way SharePoint will not be aware of the changes, but will hapilly connect to the new server. Even if you don't want to change to a new server right away, you can still use it to introduce an alias - ...


3

You probably don't have proper permissions on the SQL side. Add your login as the SQL administrator or grant the permission directly on the databsae WSS_Content, for example db_owner role. UPDATE: This should help You: Link but You should select "Windows authentication" and YOu should search for Your login name MYDOMAIN\mylogin_id


3

This was nice quest for me. I will not ask why do you need this and I hope that you don't need warning like: Never mess with SharePoint databases directly! I didn't found many articles on net covering this specific issue (no wonder when it is bad practice). The only one was 2007 related: Determining the Configuration Database in a SharePoint 2007 Farm. ...


3

It is the Application Pool Identity. For more information, see http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc678863.aspx SharePoint takes care of providing appropriate permissions for this account.


3

Updates or other operations that directly target the database are a taboo in SharePoint, so you need to search for another alternative. The batch update infrastructure comes to mind. Using batch update you can define a set of update commands that will be executed as a batch by the server. That way you will be able to process all your update as a block ...


3

SSRS, to be used in SharePoint Integrated Mode, must be installed on a server that has SharePoint installed and joined to the farm. Obviously this would not be a good idea to install SharePoint on a Database Engine server if you can avoid it. Install SSRS on your SharePoint server in Integrated mode. Yes, you must license SQL Server (SSRS) on your ...


3

IMO, you should definitely use RBS because majority of files are larger than 1MB. In your case, your DB can further grow exceptionally large because of all the binary large object (BLOB) data. And, Reading and writing BLOBs, as well as other relational data, can slow down SQL Server performance because it’s not the ideal place for storing BLOBs. By using RBS ...


3

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143219.aspx Step 15: Instance root directory β€” By default, the instance root directory is C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\110. To specify a non-default root directory, use the field provided, or click Browse to locate an installation folder.


3

From a database perspective I think the improved High Availabilty features are the main point. From a SharePoint point of view the better integration of PowerPivot and Reporting Services are the main things. And then you have the longer support time as an extra bonus. But you can go through MSDNs What's New in SQL Server 2012 to look for things which are ...


3

Here is what you should do: Run the task under designated service account e.g. CONTOSO\sp_powershell The account needs to have proper privilages, it needs SharePoint Shell Access (check Add-SPShellAdmin for more details)


3

I discovered that the problem comes from the program Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Shell (Isolated) - ENU that gets installed with SQL Server 2012. After uninstalling that program and then running the SharePoint 2013 installer I am able to see the splash screen. Warning - This will prevent Sql Server Management Studio 2012 from working on that machine.


2

One option you have is to create SQL aliases on your SharePoint servers. You will have to do this on every SharePoint server in the farm (not the SQL servers). To do this go to Start>Run and type cliconfg.exe. You can set up the alias to be the name of the current SQL servers and point to the current SQL servers. Once you have done that, you can then copy ...


2

The user which your are running under (or the SLK is running under) does not have appropriate permissions to the SQL Server instance. This means that it cannot create a database on that server. Are you specifiying a SQL Server for the configuration to use? Are you also specifying SQL authentication? If so then the account you are giving does not have ...


2

Take a look at this article for lots of reasons to use SQL 2008 http://blogs.msdn.com/bobgerman/archive/2009/04/07/moss-2007-and-sql-server-2008-better-together.aspx


2

Anders, slightly off topic for your SQL question, but I put some stuff down in a blog post regarding the upgrade path for SP2010, it might be useful for your recommendation. Then again it might not be, but its there if you want to take a look. http://www.simple-talk.com/community/blogs/charleslee/archive/2010/01/22/88088.aspx



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