Hot answers tagged

15

There are lots of point to discuss before coming to a conclusion here. But I will just explain the different possible ways you could do backup in SharePoint in an order of good to best. Central Admin Backup - This is a default UI option that comes within Central Administration. It allows to take full and differential backups. You have the additional ...


14

Given the amount of bloat and the fact there's not much in the 2nd stage recycle bin, it's more than likely Auditing has been turned on for the site collection. I believe trimming of the audit log is not enabled by default either, which could cause your content db to grow out of hand pretty quickly depending on level of activity within the site collection. ...


9

I discovered that the problem comes from the program Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Shell (Isolated) - ENU that gets installed with SQL Server 2012. After uninstalling that program and then running the SharePoint 2013 installer I am able to see the splash screen. Warning - This will prevent Sql Server Management Studio 2012 from working on that machine.


9

The TechNet Article "Storage and SQL Server capacity planning and configuration (SharePoint Server 2010)" should be your first port of call: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc298801.aspx


8

Definitely don't want to go the SQL query route because you can easily create an ineffecient query if you don't understand the underlying data model...also possible that you'll develop a query that breaks or becomes inefficient after a CU or SP is applied. CAML queries are very efficient and depending on the scope of your query you have a lot of options. ...


8

To find the table(s) which are taking up the most space run this query in SQL Server Management Studio (with your content database selected to query against). That should help you narrow it down to a particular table or tables and then from there you can determine what can be done to reduce the size. You might want to throw some "with nolock"s in there to ...


7

If you want to split your site collection into multiple Content DB and then spread those DB across both SQL server. then it is Big NO You can not have a site collection in to Multiple database, it is not supported. If you want multiple SQL server attached to a farm, then you can do it. It is supported. we have 4 SQL server attach to one farm due to ...


7

You can use Caching a DataTable Object The code in these examples suspends all other threads in a critical section running in IIS, and prevents other threads from accessing the cached object until it is completely built. This addresses the thread synchronization issue; however, the code is still not correct because it is caching an object that is not ...


6

The SharePoint_Shell_Access role gives you access to the content databases and the configuration database, and permission to execute the stored procedures. The farm administrator (not to be confused with the farm account) does not automatically have access to the content dbs. It can also grant you the role of "difficult SharePoint person" from the ...


6

The biggest determining factor here between SharePoint Backups and SQL Server backups is going to be how much content you have in your farm. Based on what I could find on TechNet, SharePoint backups are not supported for content databases over 200 GB in size (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc262787.aspx) and site collections over 100 GB in size ...


5

Microsoft licensing can seem complicated if you are doing that for the first time and I would advise you to contact a licensing specialist in your country/region that can help you optimize for best price and licensing deals. For a company of 10000 people you should not be checking these prices online, you need to talk to licensing specialist! Chances are you ...


5

I have never done it personally but Microsoft has a document that lays out the steps pretty clearly. As always, be sure to take a good backup before attempting this. Shrinking a database by using SQL Server 2008 Management Studio On the taskbar, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft SQL Server 2008, and then click SQL Server Management ...


5

First thing you should do is choose the appropriate recovery model for your databases. If you need point in time restore, go for the FULL recovery model. The price you have to pay is to make regular log backups or your logfile will grow indefinitely. Taking a full backup does not stop them from growing. If you use mirroring or log shipping, you also need to ...


5

Something to be aware of along with SQL aliasing is the SQL instance. There are instances where if patching hasn't been applied, features and services within SharePoint will not configure properly on named instances. This you can also bypass using SQL aliasing. Personally, I am a proponent of SQL Aliasing, but you should always make sure that you configure ...


5

If you use the commandlet Get-SPDatabase there are several properties of the returned object that can give you the information you need. $db = (Get-SPDatabase)[0] $db.Server Will print out the full server name, and I would assume instance, for that database. Another interesting property would be $db.DatabaseConnectionString That will print out ...


5

This can mean any of the two things. A previously deleted site collection is still residing in the content database if your farm is a SP2010 SP1 and above. This can account to different size of the site collection that shows up in the central admin and a different size for content database keeping all deleted site collections. Your Content Database ...


5

When a site collection's size is calculated, the size of the second stage recycle bin is not included. However, the size of 2nd stage recycle bin will contribute to the size of your content database. Perhaps your 2nd stage recycle bin is large? Consider emptying the recycle bin and/or adjusting its quota settings in Central Admin (web application settings > ...


4

No. IIS is only for serving up webpages. It should not be part of SQL Server, which uses tcp/ip, or named pipes to communicate with other servers.


4

You may have deleted (but not removed) SPSites in your content DB, which shows in SSMS, but not in Central Administration. To check if you do, run: >Get-SPDeletedSite If there are deleted sites, you'll see these sites listed like this: WebApplicationId : 009c1289-392b-43a6-8222-146117074738 DatabaseId : 88efc46f-5a2b-4171-81cb-7577da65bac3 ...


4

Having worked with & built similar stacks for extending/integrating SharePoint with external LOB systems, I can say our approach has been to attack it from the other end. That is, rather than trying to use the BCS to connect to an on-prem DB, we'd create a RESTful WCF service that ran on-prem alongside the DB (could be OData as well if based off a ...


4

Minimal is SQL Server 2008 Express with SP1. The main difference with Standard is you can have a larger than 4gb database. So the answer is yes. Comparisons here


4

Yes, You can. One Sql Server with two Different SharePoint Farm. Currently i have two Dev farm(2013) which are sharing the Same Database server. As long as you have unique Names for your Config & content DBs. Having Enough hardware to support both farm I am positive you will not do this in production, big risk. If DB server goes down...both farm will ...


4

The service which makes a SharePoint server web front end is Microsoft SharePoint Foundation Web Application service. If it is started in a server, it becomes web front end. The services will be available in all servers. However, it is the status (started/stopped) which determines the role. That can be checked by going into CA->Application Management -> ...


4

Unless specified otherwise in your connection string, your timer job will connect to the database using the credentials your Timer Service is running under, not the interactive user. So make sure the Timer Service account has the appropriate privileges.


4

I believe it's permission related, we didn't have as much resistance in doing that here, but I think the reason is this: In order to use PowerShell, an administrator must be assigned the SharePoint_Shell_Access role on any databases against which PowerShell will be used. For example, to perform tasks that read or manipulate data in the ...


4

Here are some details about support for large databases with SP1. http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/blog/Pages/BlogPost.aspx?pID=988 Officially there is support up to 4TBs with optimization, but realistically that is difficult to support and should only be used in extreme exceptions. Technically there were no real changes made to support the additional ...


4

Simplest answer is: No. Similar issue (follow first link provided in answer): SharePoint License for Database Server Look also at comment by Jesus Shelby The only exception would be if you are running Reporting Service in integration mode, then you would have SharePoint installed alongside the SQL instance hosting the report server.


4

Which version of SharePoint. If you're using SharePoint 2010, the easiest way is an external list with BCS through SharePoint Designer. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee557243.aspx Paul.


4

It is not supported and unfortunately it is not going to be possible for you to make it work unless you run some sort of virtualization platform on top of Windows Server 2003. SharePoint 2010 requires Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2 as its base OS. It will work with SQL Server 2005 as long as you have it patched to the correct level (at least ...



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