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5

You only need SQL Enterprise if your BLOB store location is remote to the SQL Server or put another way, somewhere other than where you are storing your content DBs.


5

Short answer, the quote above does say RBS and the content database must not exceed the limit. Not just the content DB when RBS is used. Database size is such a gray area with SharePoint. MS's recommendation of 200GB is to ease the maintenance of the database. "Content databases exceeding 200 GB and up to 4 TB support much of the same flexibility as ...


5

No, SharePoint will take care of that internally for you.


3

It sounds like you're using the ItemUpdated event. If you used ItemUpdating I believe you could modify the AfterProperties instead of performing a second update. This may be of use to you: NBSP: Event Receivers


3

IMO, you should definitely use RBS because majority of files are larger than 1MB. In your case, your DB can further grow exceptionally large because of all the binary large object (BLOB) data. And, Reading and writing BLOBs, as well as other relational data, can slow down SQL Server performance because it’s not the ideal place for storing BLOBs. By using RBS ...


3

We have a web application dedicated for serving up files and this is what I can tell you from my experience. The design of the web app is to house executables, license codes, and installation guides, so pretty similar to your requirements. The executables can range from 4MB to 1.5 GB with guides in the 200k range. Under normal load, there aren't too many ...


3

Whilst a content database can contain more than one site collection. A site collection however, can contain only one content database. RBS can be used to prevent database growth as it stores data in physical location. See more about RBS here: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee748649.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396


2

No, You cant have one site collections in more than one content DB. Yes, you can use the RBS to increase the database storage. If your site collection grow beyond the 200GB(i am guessing you hreach 200GB not 4Tb) limit, i would highly recommend that perform the cleanup operation on the site collection and delete the unwanted stuff. Or split the site into ...


2

That is right msft recommend 200gb size of content DB but it is not hard limit, you can go upto 4 TB or even more if you have all required hardware which mentioned in technet. If your DB growth setting is not restricted and have plenty of space on dB server's data drive then sharepoint will continue....it will only stop if your database caped to 200gb. I ...


2

I had the same issue, run the RBS_x64.msi directly (double click on it). It'll walk through a wizard and create everything you need.


2

Start Command Prompt using the Run as administrator option. msiexec /qn /lvx* rbs_install_log.txt /i RBS.msi TRUSTSERVERCERTIFICATE=true FILEGROUP=PRIMARY DBNAME="SP_Content" DBINSTANCE="SP2010-WFE1" FILESTREAMFILEGROUP=RBSFilestreamProvider FILESTREAMSTORENAME=FilestreamProvider_1 to Confirm the installation of RBS, open rbs_install_Log.txt, and then ...


2

If you have very basic requirements then the RBS FILESTREAM provider may be sufficient, but it really is a very limited capability. I would also caution you against the idea that it is "built in". It's every bit an add-on as a 3rd party would be and is completely administered via PowerShell...no Central Admin UI at all. If you're not concerned with saving ...


2

With RBS FILESTREAM the only filter you have available to you is size. There is no list item context when a BLOB externalized, so file type and other filters are not natively available. Additionally, the file name and extension will not be promoted to the BLOB store...you'd see something like \server\blobstore\GUID instead of an actual filename. Different ...


2

Note: You cannot enable FILESTREAM on a 32-bit version of SQL Server running on a 64-bit OS Please go over the steps for enabling FILESTREAM, maybe you missed a step. This is how I would enable FILESTREAM for SQL Server 2008 R2: On the Start menu, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2, point to Configuration Tools, and then click ...


2

What is the purpose behind the table? Accessing the BLOB data directly outside of the SP API is not supported. That being said, MS has a sample RBS implementation and details how it works which may help you out. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc905212(v=sql.100).aspx


2

While externalizing BLOBs may solve some of your performance concerns it doesn't sound like it is going to solve your core problem which is the amount of content and speed that you are throwing this content into SharePoint. Make sure you heavily review your architecture to ensure you are supporting the database IOPS required as well as understand the ...


2

This is configured via SharePoint per content database (RBS is per content database). $contentdb = Get-SPContentDatabase –WebApplication http://yourweburl $rbs = $coontentdb.RemoteBlobStorageSettings $rbs.MinimumBlobStorageSize = <size in bytes>


1

Solved my issue.. i checked the user context which my sharepoint web application is running. i thought it was another user than it really was. so i checked the rights for this user on my DB... obviously there were none.. so i set them up and at least this error was solved.


1

Yes, you can upgrade your SQL Server after you install SP 2010. You can even start off by using SQL Server 2008 R2 Express then upgrade to higher editions. But, your job is made easier if you start up with SQL 2008 R2, then install SP 2010. Make sure you back up you databases before proceeding.


1

Also, if not already enabled, you may want to enable BLOB Caching on the WFE servers. This will not improve upload performance, but it will help in downloads by storing frequently used data into the WFE servers memory (saving you a round trip to the DB).


1

I successfully migrated RBS enabled database into new cluster. This article was very helpful: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd283097.aspx. It is very important to take note of the filestream provider name. Then you can detach database, and copy primary file, log file and BLOB storage folder to new server and attach. It is also important to ...


1

I would say that the problem isn't a SharePoint problem (SharePoint is really speaking just a ASP.Net website reading and writing to a SQL database), but more of a SQL Problem. I found a good article where Microsoft did some research on the topic. Read here: http://research.microsoft.com/pubs/64525/tr-2006-45.pdf


1

I don't see why not. I havn't tried myself, but as long as you put your VMs and storage accounts in same affinity group, I would assume that Azure's internal disks are fast enough to be wihtin the 20ms latency requirement, but a test would be the only way to know for sure. Also be sure to look into striping your disks if you want to obtain good IOPS. Read ...


1

There is no possibility for any kind of custom Remote Blob Storage for Office 365. You must use an on-premises service such as SharePoint 2013 or file shares locally. You could build a SharePoint App that Surfaces the data/links to your on-premises data.


1

Even if it was available in the online versions, Remote Blob Storage would just offload the files to the file system of the SharePoint servers (or wherever MS would deem appropriate), not keep them locally. In conjunction Wictor's suggestion, you could also try to use a Page Viewer web part and point it to the local file share. This will surface the files ...


1

What you mean by document storage. If you want to store documents in SharePoint then you can use the Document Library to store document or assets library to store video, images etc. But you are talking about the back-end storage than everything in SharePoint store into the Content Database. their is another method to store data into file system using the ...


1

I have discovered that running the msiexec via command prompt didn't work. I double clicked on it and ran through the wizard, worked great after that!


1

If you have InfoPath licensed, that is certainly a decent way to go for building input forms, but building them with Visual Studio in VB or C# is not a monumental task either: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb418732(v=office.12).aspx http://blogs.msdn.com/b/cjohnson/archive/2006/09/05/application-development-on-moss-2007-amp-wss-v3.aspx ...


1

Edit: rereading it, your right to question it! It looks like you need to run the command again with your second content database. Frankly that's really terrible language on Microsoft's part, as I believe they are trying to explain that there is only one instance of the install even though you run the configuration command multiple times.


1

Bill, Steps 1 thru 5 are applicable when you set up RBS for the first time. For additional site collections all you have to do is follow step 2 and 4 (per Microsoft's Tech Support). I had a open ticket with them and ask them if they would clarify this for me. After exchanging 7 emails they agreed that only step 2 and 4 is necessary for additional site ...



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