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8

Generally speaking you will want to use SPQuery to only query items you're interested in. Unless you're doing SPList oList = web.GetList("XYZ"); for(int i=0; i < oList.Items.Count; i++) { string strLstItemName = oList.Items[i].Name; // << BAD, as you use Items here, so you fetch them from DB each loop } there shouldn't be any relevant ...


4

You can also use the SharePoint Developer dashboard to troubleshoot problems with page components. If your Developer Dashboard doesn’t offer you enough information, you can make use of SPMonitoredScope in your code. How to enable it ? To enable dashboard you need to create the Usage and Health Data Collection Service Application. Use the below powershell ...


3

I just kept more than 5 WebParts on my page but the loading time difference between page without WebPart and page with WebPart is of max 2-3 seconds. For more detailing i would like to say that i kept OOTB WebParts. And your question will not have any specific answer as the scope of answer is too wide. Still i am listing some of the thing which you must ...


3

You don't need any specific tool for that. Just remove the webparts one by one until you see the performance rise. If it never does, the performance problems are likely somewhere else


3

Yes, it's still valid, as it's still a SharePoint. You can read more about the limits at TechNet site: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc262787.aspx As you can see limitation are the same for SharePoint 2013 on premise and SharePoint online


3

The general view seems to be that REST is indeed more "chatty", i.e. more calls are required than CSOM and more traffic goes back and forth (although REST payloads are smaller) BUT, REST can still be faster in terms of the overall time taken. It will vary depending on different situations. My personal preference is to use REST over CSOM, especially whenever ...


3

I know this is old but that "waiting for server" is normally the server processing your request, this is due to structural navigation being generated, content queries or searches webparts being generated, too many webparts and so on, this is called TTFB or Time To First Byte. So your "Waiting for server" is not the amount of time it takes to send back the ...


3

A different way to doing this is to use retention policies. You can get them to run off a given date field as well as set it to X days/months/years. No need to pause workflows as you simply run the workflows when needed. Retention should be under settings for the library/list. (Please note that I use SP2013 but it should work in SP2010 as well: http://...


2

For only 34 items, I wouldn't have any qualms about doing it. Workflow engine performance is affected when large numbers of workflows are paused at the same time because each time the timer job runs, it basically decompresses every paused workflow to check whether it's time to resume the workflow, and if not it then re-compresses the workflow until the next ...


2

As long as you stick to the principle of storing the SPListItemCollection in a variable before looping through the items, the difference between using for instead of foreach is close to redundant. The foreach loop will be converted into a for loop under the hood. It's a 1, perhaps 2 sec, difference. So if you write: var listItems = SPContext.Current.List....


2

Some things to consider: Make use of the object cache. You can always beef up SQL--add more memory. You can also add more servers to your farm to open up two lanes of possible web traffic. Retention policies can be set into place to clean up an environment of unused sites, content, historical data, tests, junk, redundancy, etc. On that note, you could set ...


2

Here are few more things which you can do to improve performance: 1) Avoid giving reference of plugin files in each web part(ex bootstrap.css, jquery.min.js etc.), instead give references of such files in the master page itself and with the help of javascript append those references in the iframe of web parts. 2) Open audit option in console, find unused ...


2

Couple of things to check. Check resource utlization on the Web Front servers(CPU and Memeory) Check the same thing on SQL server Enable the Verbose logging and then Check the ULS logs during that time frame. check if Object cache is properly configured enable the Developer Dashbaord and check where it is taking too much time. check if Distributed cache ...


2

When performing a lookup on a metadata field associated with document, I always added a "Pause for Duration" action of 5 minutes at the start of the workflow. Reason being, uploading a document with metadata is a 2 step process. First, the document is uploaded. Second, the metadata is submitted after the document is uploaded. The problem is that the workflow ...


2

Antivirus Always cause the issue. MSFT have the guideling regaring the AV. You ave to exclude the Certain folders from the AV scan. Hive Folder ULS Logs Folder IIS virtual Direcotries App / Local Fodler for the service account. SharePoint Installed Location and more Please check Below KB for complete list of the exclusion. Certain folders may have to be ...


1

Your question will not lead to any specific answer as its scope is too wide. First of all you need to know the cause of your problem. So 5 Reasons Why You Have SharePoint Performance Issues is the great article which describe why we face performance issue in SharePoint. Please look it once. There are so many criteria on which performance depends. Some of ...


1

Updated There could be numerous of things causing this issue. Custom Code, Configuration issues in IIS such as the Application Pool or Firewall settings between servers. Before we do anything else, take backup of the SharePoint databases you care about, such as Content databases, MySite databases, User Profile Databases (if customized), Managed Metadata ...


1

The best place to store files isn't depended actually on where it is. In my opinion it is only important, that "Everyone" has reading permission to the library where u store the files. For me it's on the TopLevel Site (because everyone has reading permission on it). For your scripts you can add a library, to which everyone has reading access. For pictures I ...


1

Have you tried to pinpoint which of the webparts on your page is causing the slow loading? By for example just delete or add them one by one and see differences in load time? Some general tips for improving the performance: Add an index as proposed by Nisarg (don't you see the Indexed Columns link in list settings?) Restrict number of items shown (use ...


1

Try using SPList.GetDataTable method MSDN: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/microsoft.sharepoint.splist.getdatatable.aspx public DataTable GetDataTable( SPQuery query, SPListGetDataTableOptions flags, out SPListItemCollectionPosition position ) With this method you can read with a single query all the information in a c# datatable. ...


1

As a Start point you can do following things: Check the Hardware on the SharePoint WFE( Memory Usage and CPU), check if/which process is eating up Drive space on the SharePoint Server SQL Server Hardware checks (Connections, Memory, CPU etc) Hardware should meet the min requirement if you have multiple servers then check each individual server. Check the ...


1

The retention stages Roland suggested are a great and simple solution to your needs. (I'm in 2010.) Go to the list or library settings Select "Information management policy settings" under Permissions and Management Select your content type, probably Item or Document Enable retention, then click "Add a retention stage" Set Time Period to Created Date + 1 ...


1

Certain things can optimize it if you haven't used:- 1) Get only those columns which you require eg if you need only Title and FileReaf column then use like the below one query.ViewFields = string.Concat("", ""); 2) Set row limit It would be more easier if you can provide number of pages in that library and your caml ...


1

Their are couple of reasons which cause the performance issue. High CPU utilization on WFE, Memory Usage on WFE High CPU and Memory Usage on the Database Traffic Unuassal Traffic on the sharepoint Structure the Farm/ site collections in a way it exceeds the MSFT recomendations i.e List views threshold violate number of columns number of web applications ...


1

In the context of general c# comparistions between for and foreach - There is a pretty comphrensive discussion here for loops on List are a bit more than 2 times cheaper than foreach loops on List. Looping on array is around 2 times cheaper than looping on List. As a consequence, looping on array using for is 5 times cheaper than looping on List ...


1

You can measure the time by using a global variable like this: window.StartTime = new Date() And in your onQuerySuccess() console.log("The query returned after" + ((new Date() - window.StartTime) / (60*60)) + " seconds") You could try to use REST based api for better performance... https://msdn.microsoft.com/de-de/library/office/JJ163876.aspx


1

You can use Visual Studio 2013/2015 Web performance and load tests feature: https://channel9.msdn.com/Events/SharePoint-Conference/2014/SPC381 https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj710162.aspx For the question, "how many users request per second ,latency , average number of users per day" you can use IIS Logs http://todosharepoint.blogspot.com.ar/...


1

When you create a cache host, it should use 10% of the memory size. I say should, because that doesn’t happen all the time. Sometimes it uses 50% the memory, and sometimes 5%. Don’t ask why. But you can see the configuration of the cache cluster if you run Export-CacheClusterConfig. Use-CacheCluster Export-CacheClusterConfig -path C:\Temp\...



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