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4

Phil, TransportCredentialOnly is not using SSL - this is really a way to tell WCF that the security is in the message credentials - and as we know Windows credentials are not really secure so if used you might want to use IPSec. If you are looking for SSL security with Windows Authentication you need to ensure you endpoints are configured for SSL and use ...


4

You can disable the http binding in your IIS. Open the site and have a look on the right side under "Actions" you will find "Bindings". Allow only the 443 binding with a valid certificate for your site and remove the 80 port binding ;) If you do this then users will not be able to reach anything with http anymore for this site. You can use the Rewrite ...


3

you dont need to extend the web app rather you have to update the IIS bindings. On the WFE servers, Add the Binding for the SSL & attach the certs. Now update the Https entry into the AAM via Central Admin. check this guide: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/sowmyancs/archive/2010/02/12/how-to-enable-ssl-on-a-sharepoint-web-application.aspx


3

When you changed the My Site Host URL did you extend and map it to your original my site host or did you just add the binding in IIS and then change AAM? Change the web application and ensure that all of the dependancies are working as well as changing the setting in the User Profile Service Application. Ensure that the URL you wish to use for the MySite ...


3

Some good responses to a similar post here - HTTP vs HTTPS Performance. (There is some overhead due to the extra handshaking with SSL).


2

SSL will impact the performance a little for each request due to the extra HTTP negotiation and request/response encryption. However, having said that, it wont have any perceivable effect on your New Zealand users any more than it would your users right next to the server. Latency is your problem there, and SSL will add mostly CPU load to your server.


2

We've used NewsGator in the past as an RSS aggregator (which supports https feeds) and it works quite nicely. Basically they have their NGES Server that aggregates all of the RSS feeds that you'd like, and then they have web parts that you can use in SharePoint to display those feeds inside of SharePoint.


2

If you are trying to refer to assets (scripts, images, stylesheets, etc.) that are available on both http and https you could use scheme-relative urls (//). For example: <script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.8.2/jquery.min.js"></script> This will also work for assets located on your local SharePoint server, given you can ...


2

The normal configuration for your scenario is to rely on the alternate access mappings (AAM). I'm not sure what setup your are using for your web application, but the best practice approch would be: Create new web applciation with SSL Url: https://customesite.com (Zone = Default) Add internal URL for this web app in the AAM configuration Internal Url: ...


2

Yes you have to extend the WebApplication, this will create a new IIS site responding to the new URL, but serving up the same content and then you can assign the proper certificate to that on each web front end server. And you of cause also need to make the DNS point at the same IP.


2

Apparently it is not possible to switch to HTTPS after setting up the root HNSC web application without SSL (-SecureSocketsLayer parameter) - see "SPSite.Rename not working from HTTP to HTTPS (HNSC)". The solution: You will have to delete the existing HSNC web application (make sure to not delete the content databases[!!!]) and recreate it with the ...


2

To extend a Web application to use an SSL certificate, there are several steps that must be followed and configured in the right order. What i did when i was going to extend my webapplications to use SSL, i followed this guide, which i think is the best up to date. Remember to use a real certificate for production environments. And of course always test it ...


1

You need to configure Alternate Access Mappings to work with UAG. Pay special attention to the section about publishing with a reverse proxy. It should look like this: Internal URL Zone Public URL http://portal.company.com Internet https://portal.company.com The easiest way to understand these that I have read is this: ...


1

You can handle both HTTPS and HTTP on the same web application. What you are looking at is Alternate Access Mappings. Here is an MSDN Blog article abou how to do it. http://blogs.msdn.com/b/sowmyancs/archive/2010/02/12/how-to-enable-ssl-on-a-sharepoint-web-application.aspx At a high level, here are the steps: Go to CA and under Web Application Management ...


1

Yes. You can extend the web application which will create a new IIS site, and you add your HTTPS binding and certificate here. Both "sites" will share the same data. You will need to add Host headers to both bindings in IIS since you are using same port/IP, and validate the alternate access mappings are correct in Central Administration. SharePoint will ...


1

If you changed the public URL in AAM & configured the IIS website to use SSL it will work without extending to a new website. However, whenever you will add a new webserver SharePoint will configure the original IIS settings that it knows about. That's why it's so important to specify the right public url & host header upon creation of a new web ...


1

An easier no code solution is to configure IIS to handle it for you. Create a new site setup with the hostheader customsite.com, and on port 80. Within the site, select HTTP Redirect under the IIS group: From here you can redirect to https://customsite.com.


1

You need to change the HTTPS Employee host header off of 80. Because HTTPS is required, no one should be using the TCP port for that site. Go to Start -> Adminsitrative Tools -> IIS Manager -> Expand server -> Expand Sites -> Click on your HTTPS site -> Bindings... -> Highlight Http -> Edit... -> Change port to port 81. Also make sure port https has a ...


1

Open the Central administration console —-> Application Management—>create or extend web application Click create a new web application –> fill all the fields & select port number as 80 and fill the host header. Click ok to proceed for site creation. In this way you can create multiple sites running on port 80. If this way doesn't ...


1

Note that accessing data cross-protocols will breach Same Origin Policy. You can get around this by using a relative URL, or just start a full path URL with // instead of specifying protocol.


1

From my experience, no. I've used it in both http and https environments without issues.


1

This does just sound like an browser issue not specifically a SharePoint one. Almost any browser will balk at having mixed-content on a page, Chrome has been more aggressive of late at preventing mixed-content, insecure ssl. You could hack chrome for all your users. http://www.labnol.org/software/disable-insecure-content-in-google-chrome/20501/ ...


1

Your post is a bit vague and you need to provide details of what exactly isn't working. Harbar is the best resource out there for setting up multi-tenancy and works fine for me. Are you following all the steps exactly? Also, did you use AutoSPInstaller to install and configure your farm? AutoSPInstaller is great for single-tenancy deployments, but ...


1

Instead of collecting all the SiteCollections and then all the Site I'd run though all in one sweep, collect the Url and deallocate when done with each: In Main: foreach (SPWebApplication webApp in service.WebApplications) { foreach (SPSite currentsite in webApp.Sites) { ProcessWeb(currentsite.RootWeb); currentsite.Dispose(); } } In ...


1

Certificates can only be applied at the WebApp level in IIS, and you can only assign one certificate per application. Unless you are using a reverse proxy that will change the URL's you will need a cert that covers each URL you will be accessing with SSL enabled. Because your URL's utilize different domain names, you can not take advantage of a wildcard ...



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