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4

In your scenrio before migration make sure following things. both sharepoint farm are on the same version level. all the custom solution deployed to test farm as they are in production authentication is properly configured in the test as you did in prod. Now for Content DB of web app. take the backup of content db from production web app restore it on ...


4

You must use cliconfg.exe on each SharePoint server to point the 'old' SQL Server name (and instance if applicable) to the new SQL Server name (and instance if applicable). So if you had an old SQL Server name of OLDSQL and a new one of NEWSQL, you would run cliconfg.exe on each SharePoint server, go to the Alias tab, add an alias named OLDSQL. Set it to ...


2

Some things to consider: Make use of the object cache. You can always beef up SQL--add more memory. You can also add more servers to your farm to open up two lanes of possible web traffic. Retention policies can be set into place to clean up an environment of unused sites, content, historical data, tests, junk, redundancy, etc. On that note, you could set ...


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In SharePoint querying of lists is done using CAML query instead of SQL queries. Tools like CAML Query Helper and U2U CAML Query builder can be used to generate your query and to test it. Check this post on creating Visual Webparts for SharePoint 2010 Now you can use below code as a starting point for reading data from list. using (SPSite site = new ...


2

If you have seen SharePoint do this it was custom .Net development. SharePoint is just a container, it can record metadata about your documents but SharePoint can not change the documents inside (Microsoft) Documents (when opened from SharePoint) can use that SharePoint Metadata. Without using SharePoint you can link Excel to datasources, the Data tab ...


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IMO, you're looking forward to a lot of problems if you really want to push all this data into SharePoint lists! First, you're hitting a number of hard or soft limits in SharePoint : no more than 5000 items per view, no more than 200GB per content DB, no more than 12 lookups in a query, etc. Second, conceptually, SharePoint is not a replacement for a ...


1

If the database seem to be "readonly" as you say, I think it may have been put in "Suspect" state after some issue occurred on the machine. When SQL Server thinks a database may have entered an invalid state, the "Suspect" state may be triggered - I had it once happen on a development virtual machine that was turn down during a web application creation and ...


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Database first approach using EF with external database , the steps are more or less same as in any plain .NET project. You can look at below blogs: https://www.asp.net/mvc/overview/getting-started/database-first-development/setting-up-database http://www.asp.net/mvc/overview/getting-started/database-first-development/creating-the-web-application To get ...


1

I realize this is a old post but I have come across the same issue and a solution. For my SP 2013 farm we use AlwaysOn in SQL 2012 for our databases. For reasons I haven't been able to figure out the primary SQL server fails over to the secondary and this issue pops up with only the Subscription settings service database. I failover again making my 01 ...


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I recommend you start with this book, "Inside Microsoft SharePoint 2010". The first 4 chapters can be read online at MSDN this link: Book landing page: Inside Microsoft SharePoint 2010 There are versions of this book for 2007 and 2013 too.


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From Plan document versioning: When you create a new version of a document, the incremental changes are stored in SQL Server, rather than a complete new copy of the document. In depth, it's handled by Shredded Storage that covers not only versions, but all BLOBs in general. You might want to take a look at SQL queries in that article and maybe give ...


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Found the answer here: https://community.office365.com/en-us/f/154/t/353983 Actually, a new minor version is just the incremental change from the previous version. When you create a new minor version of a document, the incremental changes are stored in SQL Server, rather than a complete new copy of the document. This provides the most efficient storage ...


1

You can shrink a SharePoint SQL Server database just like any other SQL Server database using SQL Server Management Studio. This is fine in a development environment, since you are likely the only person using it (might want to give a heads up to the team if there's more than one of you). Of course, there will be a performance impact on SharePoint itself ...


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For a development environment, no I don't see any reason you couldn't shrink it (though you should never shrink databases in production, unless you're going to gain back 40%+ space and you need it -- shrinks fragment the indexes). I would say for your dev environment, you probably want to disable most usage logging, unless you need it for a specific ...


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This error tells me that your service account does not have permission on the Backup folder. Make sure Service account under which you running the backup have read/write permission on the folder. SQL server Service account should have permission on that folder. I would always use the UNC path rather local folder.


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Check if there are no space left for Logs to be stored. Also see if there is any update required to Sql Management. I am not sure..but check for starter.



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