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14

Given the amount of bloat and the fact there's not much in the 2nd stage recycle bin, it's more than likely Auditing has been turned on for the site collection. I believe trimming of the audit log is not enabled by default either, which could cause your content db to grow out of hand pretty quickly depending on level of activity within the site collection. ...


10

This is a known issue[citation needed] and unfortunately restoring to a new content database is the only workaround (I refuse to call it a solution since you now have a new problem). Once restored, you can't move the site back either; the error it returns is about how the site used to exist in the content database. If you can, avoid deleting site ...


9

To do this we exported each site to the local file system, created a new site collection with the new content DB and them imported the site into the site collection. You can export a site using PowerShell and Export-SPWeb. I recommend testing this process too before you execute it in production, we had lots of tidying up to do with customisations etc. ...


8

Try SharePoint PowerShell: Get-SPDatabase http://njbblog.blogspot.com/2011/03/sharepoint-40-powershell-get-spdatabase.html


7

There is an information worker download of a complete environment from Microsoft. This includes a pre-populated sample AD, documents, lists, libraries, profiles, etc. http://blogs.msdn.com/b/cjohnson/archive/2011/09/15/2010-information-worker-demonstration-and-evaluation-virtual-machine-sp1.aspx


7

In SharePoint 2010 you can add additional Content Databases to your Web Application and then use the Move-SPSite PowerShell command to move site collections from one database to the other. To add a Content Database: Goto Central Admin > Application Management > Manage Content Databases. Select your web application and add a database. To use the ...


7

When I need to move content from one environment to another I use backup/restore. I see no reason in copying the files, it's far easier to use the backup/restore routines - also there are often the case that you use other tools than SQL backup to do the actual backup. Copying the files is also a dangerous option due to file locks etc, and you don't want to ...


7

To find the table(s) which are taking up the most space run this query in SQL Server Management Studio (with your content database selected to query against). That should help you narrow it down to a particular table or tables and then from there you can determine what can be done to reduce the size. You might want to throw some "with nolock"s in there to ...


7

Directly querying or modifying the database can place extra load on a server, or can expose information to users in a way that violates security policies or personal information management policies. If server-side code must query data, then the process for acquiring that data should be through the built-in SharePoint object model, and not by ...


6

I would take a look at these two links: http://ktskumar.wordpress.com/2009/03/10/sharepoint-databases/ http://grounding.co.za/blogs/neil/archive/2008/08/16/sql-databases-used-in-sharepoint.aspx They go over the various databases that SharePoint has under the hood and what their purposes are. That being said... I would recommend staying away from ...


6

Why not simply using Central Admin... :-) (works even if you do NOT have access to either the physical server (console) or databases server. Central Admin -> Upgrade and Migration -> Review Database Status. By pasting /_admin/DatabaseStatus.aspx at your CA url. Rgds, Arjan Vos


5

Whatever ID the application pool is running as needs 1) proper permissions to the config database (see this info from Microsoft) 2) inclusion in the proper security groups on the local machine (these usually start with WSS_) and 3) permission to go through the proxy using a windows credential rather than a forms-style login. If you are in a large corporate ...


5

Everything is stored in database tables. You have one or more content databases setup for each application. Each Content Database contains the content for one ore more site collections. This includes lists, documents, version, workflow content, permissions, site information, etc. The configuration information is stored in the Configuration Database, and ...


5

If you want to know databases in your farm instance, use Get-SPDatabase as suggested by another answer. If you want to understand what databases sharepoint creates and what exactly sharepoint stores in them, check Databases That Support SharePoint 2010 Products


5

When you delete a Site Collection, it will still remain in the Content database until the "Gradual Site Delete" Timer job is run (by default, it runs once daily). So, once you delete the site collection and run the timer job, then you can again restore the same site collection in the same content database.


5

You probably need to update the site map in the config db: $db = get-spcontentdatabase -Identity [insert guid of cdb here] $db.RefreshSitesInConfigurationDatabase()


5

This is an old point but I did want to point out something. When you run the command: Mount-spcontentdatabase -name (name of your db) -webapplication (name of your web app) If you happen to spell the database name wrong it will create a new database in SQL and it will then show you 0 sites. I've seen it happen and I've done it before. Just thought I ...


5

Short answer, the quote above does say RBS and the content database must not exceed the limit. Not just the content DB when RBS is used. Database size is such a gray area with SharePoint. MS's recommendation of 200GB is to ease the maintenance of the database. "Content databases exceeding 200 GB and up to 4 TB support much of the same flexibility as ...


5

I have never done it personally but Microsoft has a document that lays out the steps pretty clearly. As always, be sure to take a good backup before attempting this. Shrinking a database by using SQL Server 2008 Management Studio On the taskbar, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft SQL Server 2008, and then click SQL Server Management ...


5

First thing you should do is choose the appropriate recovery model for your databases. If you need point in time restore, go for the FULL recovery model. The price you have to pay is to make regular log backups or your logfile will grow indefinitely. Taking a full backup does not stop them from growing. If you use mirroring or log shipping, you also need to ...


5

This can mean any of the two things. A previously deleted site collection is still residing in the content database if your farm is a SP2010 SP1 and above. This can account to different size of the site collection that shows up in the central admin and a different size for content database keeping all deleted site collections. Your Content Database ...


5

When a site collection's size is calculated, the size of the second stage recycle bin is not included. However, the size of 2nd stage recycle bin will contribute to the size of your content database. Perhaps your 2nd stage recycle bin is large? Consider emptying the recycle bin and/or adjusting its quota settings in Central Admin (web application settings > ...


5

There is a couple of reasons for this: SharePoint is from companies point of view a Microsoft product, so if there is a security risk then it's seen as Microsofts fault. This is the reason for Microsoft to putting in a lot of security into SharePoint which by default isn't in ASP.Net like: not running full trust not allowing updates on GETs and ...


4

Here are some details about support for large databases with SP1. http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/blog/Pages/BlogPost.aspx?pID=988 Officially there is support up to 4TBs with optimization, but realistically that is difficult to support and should only be used in extreme exceptions. Technically there were no real changes made to support the additional ...


4

This has been discussed before recently. Assetlib has its advantages (it gets cached so i wouldnt worry alot about performance) with versioning and can be used for cloud and multitenancy (as it is not stored on the disk). LAYOUT doesnt suffer from incorrect max-age, so a single roundtrip is saved here. As always with SharePoint, the answer is, that it ...


4

Place your script files under C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\14\TEMPLATE\LAYOUTS\CUSTOMAPPNAME\JS And add the script tag <script type="text/javascript" language="javascript" src="/_layouts/CUSTOMAPPNAME/JS/script.js"></script> Please don't put the script files in the content database. In other other ...


4

I know this question is nearly a year old, but we recently had a similar problem and I thought I'd post here in case it helps anyone else. We had the same issue, a web application that, according to central admin, had a single content database with 0 site collections in it. I ran the following commands: $app = get-spwebapplication –identity “url of the ...


4

You should be backing up and truncating your TLOGS. If you have not been doing that, than yes, do a backup, truncate, and shrink will restore space. To keep that space however, you will need to set growth limits on your database and log files. Microsoft has a paper on "best practices" with SQL maintenance: ...


4

It depends! SharePoint can easily handle that amount of data and that amount of files. But there is no "magic recipie" that you just apply to SharePoint and then upload all that data. You need to think of how these documents are going to be used (read/write scenarios), you should organize them in Site Collections and sites (and with that split out ...


4

You may have deleted (but not removed) SPSites in your content DB, which shows in SSMS, but not in Central Administration. To check if you do, run: >Get-SPDeletedSite If there are deleted sites, you'll see these sites listed like this: WebApplicationId : 009c1289-392b-43a6-8222-146117074738 DatabaseId : 88efc46f-5a2b-4171-81cb-7577da65bac3 ...



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