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5

Windows Azure is PaaS(Platform-as-a-Service) that allows you to install and manage your SharePoint environment on cloud like you do on premises. You will be charged based on the space and compute hours consumed by your SharePoint farm, Visual studio, TFS etc. Much VS debugging makes you pay more :-), hence development farm on Azure may be costly to ...


3

It might be worth a shot to try adding ACS as an App in Azure AD, configure it for Single Sign-On and then using the WS-Federation end point for the app to add the Identity Provider. The first part of this post has a more detailed walkthrough: http://blog.helloitsliam.com/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?List=e10cb685-6b5c-4b6c-aaf4-e1d122d57174&ID=120


2

If you're developing Provider hosted apps for on-premises SharePoint you have two options: High Trust Low Trust High Trust The trust between SharePoint and the App is based on a certificate which the App uses to sign the token in it's request to SharePoint, this certificate is then added to the SharePoint farm and SharePoint will trust that the User ...


2

I have just had the same issue in my environment. In my case I have HTTP enabled on the workflow farm. During re-install the workflow farms HTTP endpoint disappeared (you can run the Get-WFFarm PowerShell command and check the Endpoints there). So the solution in my case was to properly configure the HTTPS endpoint and than re-register the workflow farm ...


1

Office 365 (formerly known as SharePoint online) is a cloud counterpart of SharePoint on-premises. There two types of apps which are cloud based: AutoHosted apps and Provider hosted apps. The main difference is that with auto-hosted apps all Windows Azure and Windows Azure SQL Database components are provisioned for you when the app is installed and ...


1

The scenarios you could use with SharePoint are: Save the database file in SharePoint itself and check it in and out when you're using it just like you'd do with any other file. This is kind of rickety and SP isn't really going to do a great job of telling you what changes you made, but it's possible, I guess. Use Access Services to, in essence, host the ...


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I don't see why not. I havn't tried myself, but as long as you put your VMs and storage accounts in same affinity group, I would assume that Azure's internal disks are fast enough to be wihtin the 20ms latency requirement, but a test would be the only way to know for sure. Also be sure to look into striping your disks if you want to obtain good IOPS. Read ...


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There are mainly two ways Use BCS in SPO with a WCF endpoint to access data in SQL Azure leveraged through an external list Use client side techs such as JavaScript or Silverlight For an example with jQuery and JSONP check out: http://www.wictorwilen.se/Post/SharePoint-Online-and-External-Data-using-JSONP.aspx


1

Not sure if this helps in your situation but take a look at this site.. Open the SharePoint 2010 server that hosts Central Admin Click Start Click All Programs Click SharePoint 2010 Products Click SharePoint 2010 Management Shell (run as administrator) Type Set-SPUser -Identity 'Domain\UserName' -Web http://''' -SyncFromAD Hit Enter (the script will run ...


1

After 5+ (!) weeks investigating this with MS tech support, we finally determined that the Windows Service "Performance Logs & Alerts" was set as Disabled startup type. Changing that service to Manual startup type allowed the installer to complete. This problem was indicated nowhere in the logs or any other trace as far as I can tell. There was no ...


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Azure is a collection of cloud services provided by Microsoft. One of the services allows you to host your own Virtual Machines in Azure. You still need to buy the licenses of all the software you install on these machines. It's basically the same situation as when you install SharePoint on a server within your organisation. Microsoft calls this ...



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