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I have a Sharepoint 2010 site which is hosted by my institution. I have "Design" access to the site so I can use Sharepoint Designer, but as far as I know I don't have developer access.

I created an "absence calendar" on this site using a custom list with a calendar view. Users request time off by creating a new list item, which then enters a custom approval workflow before it shows up on the calendar.

A manager has requested that an email be sent at the beginning of each week which shows upcoming absences for the week. I've poked around some, but I haven't found an obvious way to accomplish this. Does anyone have a suggested approach?

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Timer job will complete your need but it requires development ! –  Arsalan Adam Khatri Mar 30 '13 at 21:18
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1 Answer

enters a custom approval workflow before it shows up on the calendar.

This is fine. Approval workflows are out-of-the-box, and you don't need even SharePoint Designer.

A manager has requested that an email be sent at the beginning of each week which shows upcoming absences for the week.

This kind of requests cannot be fulfilled with workflows I think for a ton of reasons. SharePoint workflow are item-event-driven, information is item-scoped and cycling is not easy life in terms of design and performance.

For such a requirement I'd try another approach.

  • I'd first implement a powershell script which gathers and formats the required information from the list and sends it to the recipients.

  • Then I would schedule the script through the Task Scheduler to start at the beginning of each week.


As per the comments "It sounds like you have a solution in mind: would you mind posting it as an answer and I can pass it along to the group who handles site-deployment requests?"

First, you should ask your farm admin, whether Powershell Remoting is enabled and the parameters you require to connect to a powershell session remotely. They should also make sure that you are assigned to the required permissions to do your tasks.

Second you just need to install a Powershell and then add the sharepoint snapin. This also should be advised by the farm admin.

Third just start and try scripting what you want. To send emails from powershell you'll probably need some information from the SMTP server admin. To know how to access sharepoint data read technet sharepoint powershell docs.

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Thanks! One question: can I access the proper resources to execute your suggestion if I have have Designer access, and not developer-level access? –  DeeDee Mar 31 '13 at 16:39
    
What do you mean with developer-level access? To execute a powershell script like that you would need just the permissions to access the calendar data. And powershell 2.0 obviously. –  empo Mar 31 '13 at 19:00
    
@empro Thanks for the question. My institution creates department-level sharepoint sites and gives a designated "Owner" Design privileges on it. If i have lower-level access, I'm not aware of it. It sounds like you have a solution in mind: would you mind posting it as an answer and I can pass it along to the group who handles site-deployment requests? –  DeeDee Apr 2 '13 at 0:43
    
I've provided more details in my answer. bye –  empo Apr 3 '13 at 19:56
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