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We've got a task list of recurring reporting jobs. For instance, a security report that's generated daily, weekly stats from three different individuals, semi-annual rollups of data.

Our task list, however, populates the due date with the END date of the SERIES and I'd like to display and sort on the next due date. For instance, our daily reports have a Due Date of 04/21/2016, even though the current occurence is due today.

There are two issues I need to solve: 1.) Marking a single occurence (rather than the whole series) as completed, 2.) Calculating and displaying a "NextDueDate" based on Last Due Date + Recur Interval.

I suspect this is a coding issue, but I'd love to know if anyone's found a way to do this with OOTB Foundation 2010?

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3 Answers 3

You can't do this without some pretty serious custom development.

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Crap. Wrong answer @Ryan... :) Is this something where I could create a workflow that could generate the next instance of an event once the current event was marked as completed? That makes sense to me as something relatively simple...but I'm only just starting with workflows. I've got SPD, but because I'm in a user area, I'm not allowed to exploit my mad .NET skillz... :/ –  dwwilson66 Jul 6 '12 at 17:15

You can do this "without code" (don't get me started) using SPServices or a DVWP. Since these links aren't my work, I'll just give them:

https://www.nothingbutsharepoint.com/sites/eusp/Pages/Use-SPServices-to-Get-Recurring-Events-as-Distinct-Items.aspx

http://sridharu.blogspot.com/2008/01/how-to-read-recurring-events-using-caml.html

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I'm interested in your aside about "without code", and fear I may be misunderstanding the long-term ramifications of what I'm planning. May I contact you via your website for more information outside of this question? –  dwwilson66 Jul 12 '12 at 14:18
    
It's a pretty simple thing, really. I consider script, CSS, XSL, etc. to be code as well. The "no code" idea is, to me, a misnomer. The fact that these languages aren't compiled doesn't mean that they aren't code. Everyone else just hasn't come around to my way of thinking yet. –  Marc D Anderson Jul 12 '12 at 17:55
    
True...would it be fair to say client side scripting vs. server side scripting is a better way of thinking about it? This link explains what I'm trying to get at, I think... sharepoint.stackexchange.com/questions/40858/… BTW; Your Middle-Tier Manifesto is on my radar for this morning. :) –  dwwilson66 Jul 13 '12 at 11:58
    
Enjoy reading. Feel free to ping me separately if you'd like! –  Marc D Anderson Jul 13 '12 at 15:57

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