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Is it possible to measure somehow how often users hit concrete icon in ribbon menu? Or which one is most used and which one the least?

I have strange task, I must defend some particular icons in ribbon menu, because someone beleives, that no one from our 1500 users want to use it. I can explain what I want, but I haven't a proof.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think you can go that way:

  1. Register a javascript on your page which will add a Listener to all ribbon buttons on a page, but make sure, that your listener will be the second and will not break real ribbon listener. It seems it's possible to have 2 js listeners for 1 event. You can use jQuery - http://api.jquery.com/click/ or regular js - http://www.howtocreate.co.uk/tutorials/javascript/domevents and place your js code somewhere in master page

  2. Make sure, that you script is triggered after the ribbon is loaded. Cause ribbon is loaded with delay. See these links http://sharepointtaproom.com/2010/07/27/sharepoint-2010-ribbon-responding-to-tab-clicks/ and http://sharepointtaproom.com/2011/09/09/manipulating-the-ribbon-in-sharepoint-2010-with-javascript-part-1/. The easiest solution can be adding handler to ribbon tab open (first link) and set timer to 10 (time the tab content is loaded) seconds, and then registering you js handler with all ribbon buttons (jquery selector - http://api.jquery.com/?ns0=1&s=selector&go=)

  3. You can use js Client Object Model to submit gathered data to a list - http://www.avanadeblog.com/sharepointasg/2011/05/client-object-model-introduction-part-2-adding-a-list-item.html

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Can you please send me link to some page with example? I never do something like that, because I'm just Admin, not programmer. I can try it, I worked with javascript in the past –  Molik Nov 29 '11 at 11:24
    
ok, I'll check links that may be helpful for your in the evening. –  Yuri Leontyev Nov 29 '11 at 11:33
    
Thank you very much for your help, I'll try this. –  Molik Nov 30 '11 at 15:30

I'd bat it back by giving them an estimate for doing the research, including the development effort to get the stats up and running, the duration to run the test, and the gather the results, and finally the work to remove the 'unwanted' buttons.

Full days tasks, too. At you or a developer's day rate, and find out why they want to justify that cost for hiding ribbon buttons. Also hire a UX expert consultant for his opinion.

Present this to whoever suggested the buttons won't be used, in front of whoever else is stakeholders for your environment. I'm almost certain those costs can be better spent.

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(I realise this isn't constructive and not really an answer, but my pet hate is requirements like this). –  James Love Nov 29 '11 at 21:08
1  
You are absolutely right, but some people don't believe in theory, but in facts. You know, 1498 users are satisfied, quiet and with no complains (OK, just imagine that), but two unhappy users can poison your life day by day. Beside that, I look for an expert in UI, someone was worked for our company in the past... –  Molik Nov 30 '11 at 15:28

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