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I have a top link bar with the following items: Home, Front, Back, Network Each link points to a page with a heading of the same name.

When I click on "Back" and click a link within the "Back" page, the highlighting of the top link navigation changes from highlighting the "Back" top nav link to highlighting the "Front" top nav link.

Is there some way to categorize or tell the pages on the site that their parent is the "Back" page?

I am fairly new to sharepoint, I checked the navigation pages in the MSDN docs but I have failed at finding anything useful for me. Any tips would be appreciated!

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take a look at the actual URLs in the links. I think the highlighting works if the page you're on is within the URL structure of the link. Compare Front and Back, and the URL you're on, how are they different? –  David Lozzi Nov 23 '11 at 17:56
    
The pages are not very hierarchical, they both have a SitePages/Back.aspx and SitePages/Front.aspx structure, and the "subpages" are all site pages with the same structure of SitePages/pagename.aspx. So maybe I need a folder named Front/Back to represent the hierarchy? If so, can they also be pages? –  hobs Nov 23 '11 at 18:21
    
I think it may be that front is just the first item in the navigation except for home, and without a structure it default highlights the first item, I will move the order of the top links and test. - edit, yes it does –  hobs Nov 23 '11 at 18:22
    
Yeah, make some folders and see if that works. –  David Lozzi Nov 23 '11 at 18:23
    
I dont see any way to make a folder from the documents view, and is there a way to make a folder which has both displayed content and is the parent of other content? –  hobs Nov 23 '11 at 19:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The top link bar will follow your site hierarchy. The fack that a link is within a page doesn't make it a hierarchy, it's just a view.

To get the desired effect, you need to make it an actual hierarchy. For example, you could have Front and Back as subsites. The home page of the Back subsite would be your Back page, then pagename.aspx would be a page stored in the Back subsite.

A completely different approach would be to include a script in your page that will highlight the link you want. So for example namepage.aspx would include a script that highlights Back.

If you are picky about your navigation and don't want to modify your site structure just for that, then ignore the out of the box navigation and build yourself a nice menu with SuperFish.

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Thanks, this makes sense, and I think with the current nav I will likely go with the scripting option unless something changes. –  hobs Nov 23 '11 at 21:43

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