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I'm working with a 3rd party vendor who has done the SP 2010 integration of a small site. I've noticed that our incredibly simple login page is nearly 3.2 megabytes. The users of this site are the general public and will include those in rural areas who are still on dial-up. That would obviously be a terrible user experience. It's not so great for those on high-speed connections, IMO (just wasted bandwidth).

Digging into the page, I see that 2.2 megs of the page weight comes from JavaScript files marked debug. I can't see any reason why we should be sending these debug files to end users.

Can these files not be served to users?

Here's a YSlow screenshot, http://i.stack.imgur.com/msGUm.jpg

Also, do we really need to be serving core.css (192k) to end users? Is core.css all the "admin" type of SP css?

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2 Answers 2

Those files are indeed needed for SharePoint to be able to perform.

You could try altering the the compressions settings on IIS to see if things improve.

There are companies out there that specialise in WAN optimisation, like these guys: http://www.riverbed.com/us/solutions/application_performance/microsoft_sharepoint.php - though notice there's no pricing suggestions to be found anywhere, so expect to need a really fat wallet for these kinds of services.

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But they're debug files, which would imply needed during development, not deployment? –  magenta placenta May 26 '11 at 17:56
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Gotcha, in your masterpage, set the ScriptMode to Release, so that it looks like this: <asp:ScriptManager id="ScriptManager" runat="server" ScriptMode="Release" EnablePageMethods="false" EnablePartialRendering="true" EnableScriptGlobalization="false" EnableScriptLocalization="true" /> –  James Love May 26 '11 at 18:25
    
Thanks much, I'll pass this along to our vendor - hopefully it makes a difference in what's served in production. –  magenta placenta May 26 '11 at 18:57
    
This definitely stopped the SP.debug.js and the other *.debug.js files from being sent on my development VM. Hope it works out! –  James Love May 26 '11 at 19:00
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Its also probably worth noting that Microsoft themselves use a product called Aptimize for reducing payload on the server side - aptimize.com –  Benjamin J Athawes May 26 '11 at 21:13
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In your web.config set

<compilation batch="false" debug="false"> 

and sharepoint will send the none debug versions of the scripts.

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